Overview
The Caretakers'
                                Challenge - The Promise of Solutions
Feral Cat
                                Caretaking

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Adopting A Feral Cat

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For All Interested and Concerned Persons

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Instructions for Humane Trapping of Feral or Rescued Cats & Kittens

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Trap Information

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How to Domesticate and Care for Feral or Rescued Kittens

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How to Kitten Proof Your Home

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Introducing a New Cat or Kitten To Your Home

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Managed Care, Negotiating for and Relocating Feral Cats

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Feeding Instructions for Caretakers

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Feeding Priorities Under Challenging Circumstances

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Food and Nutrition

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Elderly Cats

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Sheltering and Feeding Stations

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Agreements

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General Adopton Agreement

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Spay/Neuter Resources

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PDFs

About FCCC
Upcoming Events
Membership,
                                Support, and Donations
Links
Contact Us

 

 
INSTRUCTIONS FOR FEEDING FERAL CATS

  1. Feeding stations are best kept out of sight. This is to protect the food from being contaminated or destroyed. Fresh water should be available and kept clean.
  2. It is important to have dry food in containers that keep the food dry and out of the elements. This may require innovative construction of special feeding stations, unless you are feeding at your home in a garage, carport or other sheltered areas. If wildlife is not an issue, having dry food available will keep the cats close to their territory. They will not roam to beg and search for food in unsafe places.
  3. Feeding should be done daily. Dry feeders need to be refilled, kept clean from debris and dirt. If you are feeding in a public place, food plates or bowls need to be cleaned and/or picked up each day to avoid exposing the feeding location and possible complaints from neighbors. Any obvious neglect might impact the ferals, as there may be persons who are hostile and destructive. The more discreet you are in caretaking, the better for all concerned.
  4. It is best to feed wet food at the same time each day, preferably in a.m. and/or early p.m.
  5. Be observant of those who show up for feeding. Check for injuries, appearance of illness, pregnant females, lactating females, kittens or any other unusual situation.
  6. Do not discuss your feral cats with strangers or offer information as to their numbers or where they are located. Be friendly, but vague. You do not need to identify yourself to anyone you do not trust. If you have a problem, contact us and we will advise you.
  7. Take special care that the feeding area is kept clean from debris or unusual amounts of cat feces. This would be of special concern if you feed large numbers in a limited space.
  8. Arrange for someone to feed if you are going on vacation or are ill. A back-up is always necessary as circumstances can change drastically in 24 hours.

As Caretakers we honor and protect those in our care and try to forsee any problems that may arise. The ferals cats and kittens have much to teach us about ourselves.

Dona Cosgrove Baker, President and Founder, Feral Cat Caretakers' Coalition

 

 

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